Inevitable Ascension by V. K. McAllister

Inevitable Ascension by V.K McAllister, 342 pages, KZA LLC, September 12th 2015, Genre: Science Fiction/Dystopian/Time Travel. Warning: May Contain Spoilers.

By Leigh Holland.

If you could look into the hearts of all mankind, and determined they were wicked, what would you do?

This is the story of Violina and Lux, two thieving gals making their way the only way they know how in a corrupt world run by oligarchic criminals. They’d rather not hurt people, just take what they need to save up for retirement and, well, retire. So they can stop all the thieving. Speaking of vicious cycles, this book has many of them. Its twists and turns unfold at well-paced intervals to keep you turning the pages. Once the duo began traveling through time, I couldn’t put it down. Revelation occurs for the reader as it does for Violina, making it a pleasure to read. It was as if I was traveling with them, rooting for their survival.

The action goes by so quickly it’s not until you pause to come up for air that you realize there are deeper questions simmering in your mind. Mankind has built and destroyed how many civilizations? Yet we keep trying. Wow, humans are completely insane, or completely corrupt, with the ones who aren’t insane or corrupt just trying to avoid the crosshairs of the ones that are. Which pretty much sums up why everyone in a position of leadership and power is either insane, or corrupt, or both. Will we ever get it right? What does getting it right even mean?

I loved this read. It was quirky with charming, memorable characters. It’s a fast-paced, thrilling ride with surprising twists.

Check this one out at Inevitable Ascension.

Book Description:

If you knew your world would soon be torched to carbon, would you fight to save it?

…Or light a match of your own?

Violina, a girl polarized by love and loathing, finds herself thrown into a post-apocalyptic world with mankind on the brink of extinction. Discovering the means to travel back in time, she teams up with the ever-optimistic, pun-loving Lux and sets out to prevent the apocalypse from ever happening in the first place. But as her crusade advances, she becomes increasingly disgusted by humanity’s apparent *lack* of humanity and comes to a frightening realization: To build a new world, she must first tear the old one down.

Inevitable Ascension—The twisted jigsaw puzzle of a story with equal parts rapid-fire action, humor and charm. It’s got a host of twists that will literally make your brain explode! Actually not literally, you know, because otherwise that would be really gross.

About the Author(s):

We’re a husband/wife duo (Andrew and Sasha McAllister) with a unique approach to writing. We work simultaneously and in secret before combining what we come up with, resulting in dramatic and unexpected twists that surprise even us! Crazy? Yes, yes it is, but it’s surprisingly fun and effective. 🙂 We pretty much live for the Inevitable Ascension series and did just about everything ourselves—the writing, the editing, the publishing, the art (well, Andrew did the art, but Sasha provided invaluable consulting when it came to eyebrows), the audio book, the trailer—everything. We’re basically a one-man band, except with two people… and no music… so perhaps not the best metaphor, but we’re confident you get what we mean.

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Dawn of the Dreamer by L. J. Higgins

Dawn of the Dreamer (Dreamer Trilogy Book One) by L. J. Higgins, 290 pages, Creativia, 3rd Edition, December 22nd 2015, Genre: Young Adult/Mystery/Science Fiction. Warning: May Contain Spoilers.

Review by Leigh Holland.

Just a couple of weeks ago, I read a news article in which employees allowed themselves to be microchipped by their employer. The employees volunteered and spoke of its advantages, such as not having to replace lost or worn badges, not having to keep track of a badge, and not having to turn one in after no longer employed as it could simply be deactivated. The article also represented opposition to the concept as being born from a sort of religious hysteria, while reinforcing how innocent the wrist chips were. How we should trust them not to do anything dangerous. A friend asked me if I’d ever allow a chip to be inserted in my body. My response was “Over my dead body.” And no, it has nothing to do with religious reasons. It’s a carefully developed distrust of powerful people and organizations seeking even more tools for power. That includes corporations, governments, etc. They may be benignly trying to make our lives easier, but given how rarely that proves to be true, why risk it?

Dawn of the Dreamer shows precisely why no free thinking person should support such an idea. It’s 2023 and the MMC (MultiMind Corporation) has implanted the wristochip in human beings. It regulates sleep and during sleep, makes the person smarter, sharper, better. Touting itself as the next step in human evolution, the rare segment of the population who are immune to the writochip are called the dreamers. They are social pariahs, inferior to the rest of them. Their friends and families turn them into MMC, who imprisons them in the name of ‘curing’ the dreamers. We follow Amelia, a dreamer, as she navigates a world in which she must hide her immunity to the wristochip. Her status affects her self-esteem, which in turn affects her relationships. She believes she’s inferior and behaves as such, playing the subordinate to her best friend, Sarah. Two men are romantically interested in Amelia: Cameron, her nurse at the sleep center, and Joe, a man Sarah dated. When Sarah discovers Joe likes Amelia, Sarah turns Amelia in for believing something may be wrong with what MMC is doing with the wristochips and wristcuffs. No more outpatient treatments for Amelia- she’s kidnapped and placed in a research wing to be used as a guinea pig in MMC’s attempts to “cure” all remaining dreamers. As the stakes are raised, Amelia and other dreamers find their very existence at risk.

My favorite character was Cameron. He remained devoted, both to Amelia and the cause of freedom, throughout. He was a rock for Amelia in troubled times. I wished we would’ve learned more about the four primary and supporting characters in this installment of the trilogy, but their characters may be explored further in future books.

The creepiest thing about the article I read a little while ago was the statement that it would be another fifty years before humanity would willingly accept the “wristochip”, because currently there is too much opposition, but that opposition will disappear by then. That’s from real life, not a science fiction novel. Dawn of the Dreamer comes at the right time to remind us why we need to remain opposed to attempts to implant devices within our very bodies, and why we need to continue to teach our children to resist all such efforts. They may tell us they’d never use them for tracking, spying, control, or remote assassination. But how do you really know until it’s too late? Why risk it? I’d rather risk inconvenience from losing my badge.

I enjoyed this novel and would recommend it to sci-fi audiences. You can find it at Dawn of the Dreamer.

Book Description:

In 2023, MultiMind Corporation releases the Wristcuff, giving its wearers pleasant dreams and improved health. At least this is what the majority of Earth’s population believes.

For the Dreamers, this technology fails to work, and they’re shunned because of their inability to adapt and evolve like the rest of the human race.

Amelia is a Dreamer. When she meets someone who helps her see through the veil of MMC’s lies and secrets, her world is shaken and changed. Amelia has to decide whether to fight for the freedom to dream, or take the ‘next step in evolution’ with the rest of society, at the risk of losing her ability to think and dream for herself.

About the Author:

L J Higgins writes fiction with an intriguing twist. Stories that remind you to open your eyes, minds and hearts. Hailing from Queensland, Australia, she is a wife, and stay at home mother of two young children.

Always intrigued by dystopian worlds, the advances in technology, and what those might mean for the future of the human race, L J Higgins enjoys creating stories that explore these ideas. She is also passionate about helping teens through some of the battles they face as they go through high school, and writes stories to empower them, while showing them how their choices can affect the lives of themselves and others.

The World Without Crows by Ben Lyle Bedard

The World Without Crows by Ben Lyle Bedard, 401 pages, May 16 2017, Genre: Post-Apocalyptic/Dystopian. Warning: May Contain Spoilers.

Review by Leigh Holland.

Remember how excited we were when Hollywood started making good zombie movies and tv shows, and suddenly, we couldn’t get enough of zombies? Well, until they beat us to death with them and we were finally double tapped out on them. One morning, there we were, carrying our zombie lunchbox, wearing our zombie t-shirt, groaning at the kitchen table as we slowly raised the milk-laden cereal spoon to our lips, glancing at the zombie poster on the wall. And we realized, ironically, we’d gorged ourselves on zombies. We’d lost that excitement we felt at the beginning. We put ourselves on a diet, rationing our zombie intake.

Prepare to feel that familiar sense of excitement again as The World Without Crows raises it from the dead. I thought I could never love a serious zombie horror novel the same way again, but this book proved me wrong. For a topic that’s been done to death, Bedard reinvigorates it with complex characters in a world gone mad. This story isn’t so much about what happens to humans when there are zombies in our world. This story is about what happens to humans when there is no humanity in our world.

We follow Eric, an overweight teenage boy who has lost his parents to the Brazilian disease, Vaca B. Vaca B caused the apocalypse, the zombie scourge. Society fell apart. Once a D and D loving guy with friends and aspirations of kissing Jessica, after Vaca B, Eric is no longer as carefree. Since winter freezes the zombies, he decides to travel to Maine to an island. He meets new people on his journey. Some of them are good, some are dangerous. Some he’d die or kill for. And, of course, there are zombies. Eric must fight nature, other men, and monsters in order to survive and reach his destination. There are many characters in this tale and not all of them make it. My favorite side characters include John Martin and Birdie. John Martin is an older man who shows Eric how much people need each other and why that’s a good thing. Birdie is a little girl whom Eric looks after and grows to regard as dearer than his own life.

Zombie horror, I thought I was over you. I thought we’d broken up. But it turns out, I just can’t quit you. I’d recommend The World Without Crows to anyone who loves zombie horror and/or post-apocalyptic tales.

You can find this book at The World Without Crows.

John Smith: Last Known Survivor of the Microsoft Wars by Roland Hughes

John Smith: Last Known Survivor of the Microsoft Wars by Roland Hughes, 274 pages, Logikal Solutions, 2012, ISBN-13: 978-1939732002. Genre: Dystopian. Warning: May Contain Spoilers.

Review by Leigh Holland.

*I was given a free copy of the e-book in exchange for my honest review.

This book was written in an interesting format. The last known survivor of the Microsoft Wars is John Smith, an elderly man who survived the cataclysm by hiding out in a bunker. Susan Krowley interviews him. The book is a back-and-forth interview between the two characters.

Susan Krowley is a young journalist, a profession she inherited from her father. In the future, after most of the world’s population was wiped out in the cataclysm, people inherit their jobs from their parents in a master and apprentice relationship. Because the cataclysm was so sudden, a vast amount of human knowledge was lost. Because so many lives were lost, entire skill sets disappeared from the species. She interviews John Smith.

John Smith is one of the oldest people on Earth and is a survivor of the war. He has a cache of books and a computer that works but due to not being able to get another one, doesn’t use it often. He has large amounts of valuable data on CD that humanity will likely not be able to build a machine to gain access to. Humanity has been taken back to the 1800’s after the cataclysm. He condescends to Susan much of the time, as he knows a lot and she knows so little of history. He explains that mankind’s history goes through cycles. During each cycle, we reach a technological apex, bring catastrophe on ourselves like Atlantis, and lose most technology and knowledge. Then we must begin anew anew. So the cycle goes on, ad infinitum. John presents a vast array of conspiracy theories and myth, mashed together as truth, leading to the inevitable conclusion at the end of each cycle: destruction of civilization by those human families who continue to try to control it.

The premise, myths, and theories presented were fascinating.The idea was original and thought-provoking. I would’ve enjoyed the story more had the information been presented in another format other than an interview. I’d recommend this to science fiction fans provided the reader doesn’t mind the interview style the book is written in.

This book can be found at John Smith: Last Known Survivor of the Microsoft Wars.

Leigh Holland’s Interview with Laura Pritchard

Leigh Holland’s Interview with Laura Pritchard

I’m delighted today to be able to host Laura Pritchard, author of “Monarchy”, on my author spotlight! Thanks for being here, Laura!

Thanks so much for having me Leigh!

Leigh: Tell us a little about yourself.

My name is Laura Pritchard and I am from a small town in the South Wales Valleys in the United Kingdom. I am a teacher by day and an author by night! I currently teach music to children who have been expelled from school. I have written for as long as I can remember! I have distinct memories of filling notebooks with stories from a very young age.

Leigh: “Monarchy” seems to me to be similar in some ways to other YA Dystopian fiction, such as “The Hunger Games”. How much have other Dystopian writers influenced your work? What are your favorite novels in this genre?

I have always read young adult fiction as I found myself unable to move on from that genre. My favorite authors like John Marsden and JK Rowling are still firm additions to my bookshelves. Reading so much YA meant that my novels naturally fell into that genre and dystopia is one of my favorite YA adult settings. I think that my favorite modern dystopia is The Hunger Games by Suzanne Collins as it has all of the elements of a classic dystopia and her world building skills are first class. I came up with the initial story for my novel about 2 years ago and have put all of my time and effort into perfecting it since then. Being a mum to 2 young children and a secondary school Music teacher alongside means I have become a professional life juggler and I try to fit as much writing time as I can!

Leigh: What draws you to the Dystopian genre?

One of the first dystopian novels I ever read was The Handmaids Tale by Margaret Attwood. I was assigned this book for the reading section of my English Literature A Level and read it so many times during that time but always managed to find something different after each read. It is what introduced me to the idea of dystopia and how worlds can be controlled in so many ways and also taught me about the theme of rebellion. It is definitely something that has featured as a huge inspiration for Monarchy, my first novel.

Leigh: Which actors would you like to see playing the major characters in “Monarchy” if there were a movie made of it?

What an amazing question! I can imagine Constance being played by a soft, willowy actress but with a firm mind. Someone like Emma Watson or Amanda Seyfried. For Calloway, someone quite self-assured who would be able to throw some power into the role. If we are talking ideal world then it would have to Ryan Gosling!

Leigh: What are some of your favorite films and tv shows?

I love to watch (and read!) gritty crime dramas. My partner and I have recently finished watching Designated Survivor starring Keifer Sutherland. Similarly, I’m have just finished the second book in The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo trilogy by Steig Larrson. I love complex crime plots that keep you guessing until the very end. Similarly, I hope that my books take on that characteristic. I love cliff hangers and have ended Monarchy on a huge cliff hanger. I want the audience to be thinking about what happens after the novel has ended.

Leigh: What’s your favorite motivational quote?

Tying into my earlier answers, it has to be “Nolite te bastardes carborundorum” which is taken from The Handmaids Tale. It has resurfaced recently due to the novel being made into a TV drama in the US. It is definitely a motto for my life and for writing in particular. Stay positive no matter what. This is such a tough industry to break into and you will be knocked down time and time again. The main thing is to have belief in what you are doing and to keep going as there will be so many points when everything seems worthless. Have passion in what you write and use that passion to drive you onward with your ideas.

Leigh: Why did you choose the Indie route over traditional publishing? What advantages did you find in this publishing route?

I self-published simply for the fact that I wanted people to have access to my novel. I have so much love for it and wanted to be able to share that with people. To me, having my work read is much more important than having my work sold and having reviews showing people sharing that love for my writing makes me feel like I have succeeded.

Leigh: If you could meet one famous person from history, who would it be and why?

Again, another good question! I’d love to meet Anne Frank. I recently holidayed in Budapest and spent a lot of time visiting WW2 sites. In particular, something that struck me was the Jewish graveyard which was the burial place of so many young children who were killed in the Holocaust. The fact that Anne Frank wrote about her experiences during such an awful time is heroic and I find her novel fascinating.

Leigh: What are your hobbies?

In my spare time, I run a children’s choir and an adult’s choir. I love singing and arranging music so it’s one of my favorite things to do. We sing in the local community in churches, schools and private venues. We’ve also ventured into weddings this year! I also read as much as I can. Books are an evening pastime for me and I prefer a good book than sitting down to watch TV!

Leigh: How can readers discover more about you and your work?

My novel is available on Amazon and Smashwords. I am in the process of building my social media platform so keep an eye out for my Facebook and Twitter pages soon!

Amazon Author Page: https://www.amazon.com/Monarchy-Trilogy-Book-1-ebook/dp/B071NH99VQ/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1497862077&sr=8-1&keywords=laura+pritchard

Smashwords: https://www.smashwords.com/books/view/723257

Goodreads: Laura Pritchard on Goodreads

Thank you very much for taking the time out of your busy schedule to take part in this interview, Laura!

Monarchy by Laura Pritchard

A Dystopian Nightmare

Monarchy by Laura Pritchard, 233 pages, April 26th 2017, Genre: Dystopian. Warning: May Contain Spoilers.

Review by Leigh Holland.

Monarchy is a futuristic dystopian novel reminiscent of “The Hunger Games”. What will a person do to survive? Will they betray their morals? How far will they go? How will the bitter trials one must endure for survival in a threatening world change those who go through them?

In humanity’s past, we became divided into the extremely wealthy and the horrifyingly impoverished. With wealth unequally distributed, the poor turned to crime to survive. Disease, famine, and misery ruled mankind, with the exception of a wealthy few. A revolution changed the social order, as it always seems to in such circumstances. A new, perfected social order was established under the elusive “Monarchy”; a world where nobody goes hungry or lacks for basic needs such as clothing, shelter, medicine, or food. The cost of this perfection is the loss of privacy and a controlled society in which young adults are taken, trained, and assigned roles in the society. Most of those taken from the various sectors are thrilled to be part of the society and to serve. However, some are not- such as Constance, the heroine, and a few of the other recent recruits she’s training alongside. Constance manages to create loyalty among her group for each other rather than the Monarchy. This is forbidden. The only loyalty can be to the Monarchy. The trainers torture them through a series of brutal tests, culminating with one that breaks their loyalty to one another. Finally, they are ready for their assignments. Constance is assigned as a tower guard, a prestigious position for a new recruit. However, Constance learns about the horrible events happening around the various sectors and her doubts about the efficacy and goodwill of the Monarchy continue to grow. She wonders if she will ever see home and her father again.

Written in the first person, the reader identifies easily with Constance and her love of home and family, her uncertainty about the future. The plot was straightforward, the book well-written, and the main character well-developed. This book leaves off on a cliffhanger and is part of an upcoming trilogy of works. I enjoyed reading Monarchy. I’d recommend this book to readers who like dystopian novels similar to The Hunger Games.

This book is available at Amazon at Monarchy (The Monarchy Trilogy Book 1) .

The Amplified by Lauren M. Flauding

Intense!

The Amplified by Lauren M. Flauding, 204 pages, Blurtery Publishing, March 15th 2016, Genre: Dystopian/Young Adult. Warning: May Contain Spoilers.

Review by Leigh Holland.

The Amplified is a young adult, dystopian novel set in a world where physical prowess is what determines social status. It explores themes such as peer pressure, societal conditioning, choice and freedom versus security, and forsaking ethics for status. It draws a parallel between our world of image over substance and this fictional world of status based strictly on physical condition. This theme is starkly evident when one of the Amplified characters, Liam, saves Mari’s life, only to have everyone laugh at him for being overweight. Liam is willing to risk death in order to transform his body into one more accepted by others.

Mari Quillen is a fifteen year old girl, living in a society divided into three groups: the Regulars, the Amplified, and the Restrainers. Everyone is born into the Regulars, although the children of the Amplified are of higher status than those born to other Regulars. Mari’s parents were Regulars; in school Mari was bullied for being of lesser birth. She has an older brother and a younger brother. Her father passed away because of a virus and her mother is blind. Her mother picks beans, which are sent away for processing by the government. Nobody eats food anymore; everyone eats capsules which have varying effects. Regulars get only the regular capsules; but Amplified get a variety. Mari’s older brother returns home after four years’ service as an Amplified, fighting against their enemies, the Dissenters, who are made out to be nothing more than savages with pitchforks. Mari doesn’t like how different her brother has become.

Mari decides to go through Amplification regardless, since this is the way to succeed in their society. An amplifier is surgically placed inside her head. Whenever an Amplified issues commands to their amplifier, they are able to perform at superhuman levels in order to achieve the command. As she continues in her training, Mari discovers that not only can they not resist a command they’ve issued to their amplifier once it has been made, but that their are ways for their handlers to override their Amplification units. Indeed, the Override command is used to control them on the battlefield. They kill whether they like it or not. As she uncovers more sinister machinations of the governor, Mari begins to regret ever having chosen to become Amplified.

My favorite character was Mari. She was the only one to see that something was wrong and resist the temptation to forsake her personal values for the sake of societal status. Despite this, Mari, like all of us, is flawed. When her friend clearly was in need, she failed to notice and only managed to be there for her after the crisis had passed. I also liked Liam; I’m holding out hope we’ll see Talina rebel against the governor once and for all in future installments.

I was surprised by how much I enjoyed reading The Amplified. The first chapter started off a bit slow, but once past it, I couldn’t put the book down. The plot was original and the characters were developed; the writing was engaging. Flauding does a masterful job of subtly weaving this dystopian tapestry, crafting a compelling tale and fascinating world. I’d recommend this book to anyone who enjoys dystopian or young adult novels.

This book is the first in a series, at The Amplified.

Dating in The Apocalypse: Sarah “The One” by Christopher John Chater

Dating in the Apocalypse
Tougher than Tinder!

Dating in The Apocalypse: Sarah “The One” by Christopher John Chater, Chater Publishing, 62 pages, July 8th, 2016, Genre: Dystopian/Science Fiction/Romance. Warning: May Contain Spoilers.

by Leigh Holland

Dating in The Apocalypse is the first novelette in a series. Each book focuses on the protagonist’s experiences with a different woman, or “date”. Dating in the modern age was already rough, trying to find love in the apocalypse is well-nigh impossible.

Human beings became immunosuppressed to the point they could no longer fight off basic diseases. Influenza wiped out huge swaths of humanity. Some remained immune and survived. The majority were men. Women are so scarce, they’re traded, fought over, and kidnapped as if they were oil. Most men would give up on love, but not Tom Collins. He’s determined to find “The One”. He’s sure she’s out there and isn’t “irradiated, diseased, or had anything amputated”. As Tom puts it:

“I’d made a list of her qualities and kept it taped to the door. I looked at it every day before I left the house.

Blonde hair. (Natural, of course. I’ll be checking roots, girls.)

Green eyes. (The color of Fenway grass, or those old 7UP bottles.)

Smart. (Coupled with the natural blonde part, this is indeed a rare specimen.)

Strong and independent. (She doesn’t shed too many tears over something as silly as an apocalypse. Can’t tell you how many drink dates turned into a bawling, apocalyptic catharsis: “Then we had to saw off papa’s leg…” Gets a little depressing.)

Caring. (Hoping this whole apoc thing hasn’t jaded her. Plenty of fish in the sea, but they shouldn’t be as cold as one.)

Worthy. (There are women these days who would whore themselves for a cheeseburger. A worthy woman knows she at least deserves fries with it.)”

Tom finally meets a woman who matches his description: Lady Sarah. There are just three problems. One, she’s entered negotiations to wed his rival, a marauder clan leader named Darryl who kidnapped his last three dates. Two, Sarah resides in an area forbidden to men. And three, Sarah thinks Tom is a bit of an idiot.

After escaping many dangerous situations during their “dinner date”, Tom extracts a promise from Lady Sarah that she will date him again if he can find a way to keep the marauder clans from raiding her city. The story ends on a cliffhanger which will set the stage for the next novelette in the series.

Although Dystopian, it is highly humorous. It’s a fast-paced, fun ride. I never imagined the apocalypse could lighten my mood and make me laugh. Chater juxtaposes a fool-for-love, reluctant hero whose primary weapon is his witty repartee against a surreal backdrop of a post-apocalyptic city. The characters were quirky and interesting. My favorite character was Lillith, Tom’s mother, a formerly frustrated fashion designer whose fifteen minutes of fame has finally arrived.

Witty and amusing, Dating in The Apocalypse wasn’t what I expected, making it a delightful read. It’s currently on sale for .99 cents at Amazon. It’s followed by three more books in the series. I’d recommend this novelette to anyone looking for an entertaining romp through the apocalypse that can be read in a single sitting.

You can find it at Amazon at Dating In The Apocalypse.

Ahe’ey: The Complete Collection by Jamie Le Fay

Ahe'ey
Epic, romantic fantasy!

Ahe’ey: The Complete Collection by Jamie Le Fay, 696 pages, March 8th, 2017, ISBN: 978-1370765775, Genre: Science Fiction, Dystopian, Social Issues, Girls and Women. Warning: May Contain Spoilers.

by Leigh Holland

This is a story about true love between a star-crossed pair: Morgan Lua, a human champion for female rights, and Gabriel, a supernatural prince from a hidden, mystical realm. The scenes switch perspective between familiar Earth and the ethereal land of the Ahe’ey; the distant past and modern day; and between major characters. Le Fay weaves a magical tale with complex characters, hidden histories, political intrigue, and desperate desires yearning for fulfillment.

But this is no traditional fairy tale. We human beings vacillate between hope and despair, living in a world where simple deeds of loving kindness can move mountains, while simultaneously the worst acts of evil we can imagine are committed. We worry about which worldview and values will triumph and resonate throughout human history. In each generation, we stand at a crossroads, and we support those with power and influence whom we think can steer us in the best direction. Morgan Lua is not content to stand on the sidelines. As the leader of the Hope Foundation, she works to improve human rights for women and minorities around the globe. Morgan is opposed by the white supremacist, far-right wing politician Zanus, who is responsible for attempts on Morgan’s life. Enter Gabriel Warren, leader of the Ahe’ey Foundation, determined to stay by her side and ensure Zanus and his hateful agenda fails. Experiencing a natural chemistry and attraction they’ve never felt before; Gabriel and Morgan fall in love.

As the story progresses, Morgan learns that there’s more than meets the eye where Gabriel is concerned. After an attempt on her life that leaves them both at death’s door, Gabriel’s mother, Viviane Queen of Ange’el, brings them back to their hidden home realm to recuperate. At first, the land of the Ahe’ey seems like a blend of fairy and angelic realms, a celestial delight. Its people are beautiful, strong, swift, and magical, none more so than the pure blood royal family. The royals believe the power within their genes will one day save humankind. As a result, they intermarry to preserve their genetic purity. A matriarchal society, women appear to be in control, but lower ranking women are controlled by higher ranking women. The caste system limits the freedoms of both royals and non-royals, men and women, alike. Although the Ahe’ey traditionally guide humanity, we find they are every bit as much in need of saving.

          Ahe’ey presents many important themes and thought provoking ideas, such as nature versus nurture, the battle of the sexes, the meaning of sacrifice, the ethics of evil for the greater good, the loss of privacy in the modern age, and forging identity in a multi-cultural world. An epic, romantic, fantasy adventure, it nevertheless provokes deeper thinking on many issues facing us today.

           Ahe’ey: The Complete Collection was originally released in twelve separate episodes. Although the collection is formatted as a single novel, its episodic nature provides it with a slightly different structure and rhythm than a traditional novel. Currently, readers can find the first three episodes free at Amazon, with each subsequent episode at .99 cents. The entire collection can be found at Ahe’ey: The Complete Collection.I’d recommend this collection to anyone who enjoys romantic fantasy adventure with a social conscience.