Interview with E.A. Minin, author of “Monoland: Into The Gray Horizon”

Leigh Holland’s Interview with E. A. Minin

Today, I’m delighted to have E. A. Minin, author of “Monoland: Into the Gray Horizon”, here on my blog. Thanks for joining me!

Good day Leigh. Happy to be here.

Leigh: Tell us a little about yourself.

Eugene: As it’s the informative part of my bio, I’ll talk numbers. Eighty four – the year I was born. One – number of children my parents had (one little egoistic child I am). Five – my age, when got into a first love triangle, back in kindergarten. Four – number of schools I changed during, before got into the university. Six – months I studied in university. Eight – jobs I had and I still work in the IT sector. Thirteen – age, when I decided I want to work with storytelling. Forty – approximate amount of failed and dropped series treatments, episodes and few feature film scripts in last six years. Twelve – months ago I decided to focus on book writing and produce stories I have in my head in book narration.

Leigh: What inspired you to write a book that takes place in Purgatory, or ‘the Gray Horizon”?

Actually I find afterlife a same pop-genre as writing about vampires or elves or passionate billionaires (probably last ones beats them all nowadays). Everyone has a fantasies or his vision on how it would be on the other side. I just wanted to share one of those I had in my head. Can’t say it’s the only one. First try was actually a movie script about human souls that work on assignments in our world, being our guardian angels, following their code and while not on assignment have their routine in Empyrean world as they call it. Maybe one day I’ll rewrite it as a short story or a novel.

Back to Monoland. I had a kind of a panic attack or an urgent need to drop words on paper. It ended up with first draft of three chapters. I came back to it in a year or so, and decided to go on with this story.

Leigh: Do you view writing as a kind of spiritual practice?

It’s a craft. It can make you feel calm or mad at times, but it’s still craft. You work on it, you become better. Part when you find an idea, a lump of threads, then start slowly untangle it into something that becomes character’s arc or a plot or a twist – that can be called a spiritual practice. Moments when you stop being you.

Leigh: What book are you reading currently?

Machiavelli – The Prince, Terry Pratchett – Soul Music and Hegel – Science of Logic

Leigh: What are you currently working on? Can you tell us a little bit about it?

Currently I work in co-authorship with Dim Zimin on a fantasy book for children. It initially was planned as a animated series (and work on it still progresses). After that one I plan to get back to second book of Monoland and in parallel finish satiric-fantasy book (also first in a series) with working title Too old for this. Third part of the Monoland is to follow and I aim to close the trilogy in the beginning of 2018. There are lots of projects to follow.

Leigh: What one thing would you give up in order to become a better writer?

Probably pride. It’s important for me to get critics in order to grow. Yet as for any human being critics and truth it holds, sometimes awakes excuses powered by pride, that holds me from changing, adapting, looking for a better turns in plot or character development.

Leigh: Do you write full time or part time? How is your writing day structured?

Part time. I write about 4 hours a day and 6-10 on weekends. Sometimes I need music to keep thoughts going and each story has its playlist to keep mind focused. Other than that, I just sit in my crafting corner. Typewriter on my left, plant, wooden skull on my right and a magic chair, that switches me to writing mood the moment I sit in it.

Leigh: Who designed your book cover?

Dim Zimin. Friend of mine and a great artist. I hope he will design covers for all the books I plan to write and publish. He has an instagram account, where he shares his works – Dim Zimin on Instagram

Leigh: How do you relax?

Reading, bathtub and reading in bathtub.

Leigh: How can readers find out more about you and your work?

 

Lnkedin: LnkedN EA Minin

Amazon Author Page: E.A. Minin Amazon Author Page

Book Links: Monoland: Into the Gray Horizon

Goodreads: E.A. Minin on Goodreads

Thank you very much for taking the time out of your busy schedule to take part in this interview.

Thank you for the invitation. I was flattered to have this opportunity.

Advertisements

Monoland: Into the Gray Horizon by E.A. Minin

Metaphysical, Philosophical

Monoland: Into the Gray Horizon by E. A. Minin, 223 pages, February 6th, 2017, Genre: Metaphysical Fiction. Warning: May Contain Spoilers.

Review by Leigh Holland.

What is death? In this new book by E. A. Minin, we follow a young recently deceased soul named Owen through his lessons in Purgatory, the Gray Horizon, where things are neither colorful as in life, nor light or dark as in what’s above and below. The best, most vibrant souls who lived life to the fullest go up when they die, while the ones who’ve been dead shells walking and caused others to have less joy fall below. Everyone else ends up in the Gray Horizon.

Minin does an amazing job of expressing his immersive world of the dead. The world is shown to us through the lessons Owen must learn as he follows his ‘curator’ Dizz. We learn the Gray Horizon is a place where you take on tasks given to you by a colorless bureaucracy in order to ‘level up’. It’s particularly sad seeing Owen have to help his mother let go of him once he’s died. Afterwards, Owen gets a stamp on his ‘passport’ and more areas of the afterlife open up to him and he moves to level two. Owen learns about the various jobs and abilities that members of Purgatory have. Owen has a difficult time navigating relationships and understanding the motivations of the souls he encounters. In many ways, the land of the Gray Horizon isn’t much different from our own.

Owen makes various pronouncements throughout the book, such as “Death is Absurd”, “Death is frank”, “Death is bureaucratic”, all the way to the final one: Death is the boss. I enjoyed reading this book and would recommend it to those who enjoy metaphysical and philosophical questions about death and the afterlife.

This book can be found on Amazon at Monoland: Into the Gray Horizon.