Monoland: Into the Gray Horizon by E.A. Minin

Metaphysical, Philosophical

Monoland: Into the Gray Horizon by E. A. Minin, 223 pages, February 6th, 2017, Genre: Metaphysical Fiction. Warning: May Contain Spoilers.

Review by Leigh Holland.

What is death? In this new book by E. A. Minin, we follow a young recently deceased soul named Owen through his lessons in Purgatory, the Gray Horizon, where things are neither colorful as in life, nor light or dark as in what’s above and below. The best, most vibrant souls who lived life to the fullest go up when they die, while the ones who’ve been dead shells walking and caused others to have less joy fall below. Everyone else ends up in the Gray Horizon.

Minin does an amazing job of expressing his immersive world of the dead. The world is shown to us through the lessons Owen must learn as he follows his ‘curator’ Dizz. We learn the Gray Horizon is a place where you take on tasks given to you by a colorless bureaucracy in order to ‘level up’. It’s particularly sad seeing Owen have to help his mother let go of him once he’s died. Afterwards, Owen gets a stamp on his ‘passport’ and more areas of the afterlife open up to him and he moves to level two. Owen learns about the various jobs and abilities that members of Purgatory have. Owen has a difficult time navigating relationships and understanding the motivations of the souls he encounters. In many ways, the land of the Gray Horizon isn’t much different from our own.

Owen makes various pronouncements throughout the book, such as “Death is Absurd”, “Death is frank”, “Death is bureaucratic”, all the way to the final one: Death is the boss. I enjoyed reading this book and would recommend it to those who enjoy metaphysical and philosophical questions about death and the afterlife.

This book can be found at Monoland: Into the Gray Horizon.

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